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Cancer Prevention and Control with System Dynamics

The webinar titled “Cancer Prevention and Control with System Dynamics” presented a systematic review focused on the use of System Dynamics modeling in the field of cancer research. The main objective was to evaluate how this methodology is applied across various studies to address complex issues in cancer prevention and control, including treatments, risk assessments, and intervention strategies.

System Dynamics Modeling for Cancer Prevention and Control: A Systematic Review

Key insights from the webinar included:

  1. Application of System Dynamics: The review detailed how both simulation models and causal-loop diagrams are utilized to study the dynamics of cancer-related issues, ranging from chemotherapy effectiveness to the impacts of environmental contaminants on cancer risks.
  2. Quality Assessment: The studies were assessed for quality based on criteria like clarity of objectives, adequacy of information sources, and the involvement of stakeholders. This highlighted a need for more rigorous standards in modeling to enhance reliability and applicability.
  3. Focus Areas and Interventions: The research covered diverse topics such as the effectiveness of cancer treatments, prevention through behavioral changes, and early detection techniques. It also underscored the importance of System Dynamics in modeling interventions like tobacco use reduction and vaccination strategies.
  4. Recommendations for Improvement: The presentation stressed the necessity for greater transparency and rigor in System Dynamics studies within cancer research. It called for the development of supportive infrastructures and best practices to foster multidisciplinary collaborations.

The presenters, Erin Kenzie and Wayne Wakeland, through their extensive backgrounds in systems science and health policy, emphasized the potential of System Dynamics to offer comprehensive insights and effective solutions in cancer prevention and control.

For those interested in exploring innovative methodologies and their practical applications in addressing complex health issues, watching the recording of this webinar is highly recommended. It promises valuable learnings in System Dynamics and its significant role in advancing cancer research.

Watch the recording below

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PRESENTERS

Erin Kenzie is an Assistant Professor at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon and holds faculty roles at the Portland State University System Science Program and the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network. She received her PhD in Systems Science from PSU in 2021. Dr. Kenzie’s research spans system dynamics, implementation science, and public health. She has been involved in research applying System Dynamics to colorectal cancer screening, behavioral health system capacity, unhealthy alcohol use screening and treatment, rural Veteran access to care, health plan-clinic partnerships, behavioral health integration, traumatic brain injury recovery, and climate change mitigation behavior.

Wayne Wakeland is Professor Emeritus of Systems Science at Portland State University. He also served as the Systems Science Program Chair for many years. He earned a B.S. and a Master of Engineering at Harvey Mudd College (1973); and a Ph.D. in Systems Science at Portland State U. (1977). He developed and taught courses on computer simulation methods and more recently a course on system sustainability and organizational resilience. His research focused on the use of computational models for studying a variety of topics, including complications during human pregnancy, recovery from concussion, and policies to reduce opioid drug diversion, abuse, and overdose deaths. Other topics included environmental/ecological sustainability and elevated intracranial pressure due to traumatic brain injusy. He has been active in the System Dynamics Society for many years and helps lead its Health Policy Special Interest Group.

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MIT System Dynamics Seminar | The remarkable universality of technology growth suggests that the green energy transition will happen quickly

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, April 5th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/94114971874 (Password: SDSP24). Our virtual guest speaker will be J. Doyne Farmer (Oxford Martin School) presenting The remarkable universality of technology growth suggests that the green energy transition will happen quickly (see abstract and brief bio below; announcement attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with him before or after the seminar, please fill out the following link by COB Friday, March 29th and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://rallly.co/invite/sVOs8NoOgYkn. Please notify me if you need to meet over Zoom instead.

Abstract

How fast will the green energy transition happen? To address this question we assembled a database on the deployment of 42 technologies, ranging from railroads to the internet.  When the individual time series are rescaled to have the same rates and levels, they have a universal form that is very close to a standard logistic S-curve. Although each technology’s rate of deployment varies due to many factors, the universal S-curve explains most of their behavior. We show that S-curve time series present challenges including autocorrelation, heteroscedastic noise and parameter bias, and develop a probabilistic method for forecasting deployment that takes these into account. Application to the time series for wind and solar energy suggest that we have still not reached rates of maximum deployment, and that the green energy transition is likely to happen surprisingly quickly.

Brief Bio

J. Doyne Farmer is Director of the Complexity Economics program at the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, Baillie Gifford Professor in the Mathematical Institute at the University of Oxford and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. His current research is in economics, including agent-based modeling, financial instability and technological progress. He was a founder of Prediction Company, a quantitative automated trading firm that was sold to the United Bank of Switzerland in 2006. His past research includes complex systems, dynamical systems theory, time series analysis and theoretical biology. He was an Oppenheimer Fellow and the founder of the Complex Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. While a graduate student he built the first wearable digital computer, which was successfully used to predict the game of roulette

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | Behavioral Epidemic Models

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, March 15th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/94114971874 (Password: SDFA24). Our virtual guest speaker will be Navid Ghaffarzadegan (Virginia Tech) presenting Behavioral epidemic models (see abstract and brief bio below; announcement attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

From social distancing and vaccination in response to the perceived risk of infection to changes in Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions under economic pressures, human responses alter the outcomes of an epidemic outbreak. While recognized in theory, this realization is not reflected in current infectious disease models at large. A grand challenge for scientists is to incorporate more realistic behavioral assumptions about human response and to couple human behavior models and epidemic models to represent change in human behavior endogenously (within epidemic models). In a series of studies, we show that the endogenous representation of human behavior: 1) improves the accuracy of long-term projections, 2) sheds light on several challenging puzzles such as early convergence to the reproductive number of one and the observed large variations in mortality rates across different regions, and 3) offers a different perspective on the health vs. economy tradeoff during a pandemic. Finally, we discuss methodological challenges in parameter estimation of behavioral epidemic models.

Navid Ghaffarzadegan is an Associate Professor in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech. He applies simulation techniques to study complex social systems and policy problems, the main application areas being health and education policy. His research has been supported by several competitive grants from NIH, NSF, and DOD. His COVID-19 studies appeared in various leading journals in health policy such as Health Affairs, BioScience, Lancet Planetary Health, and PLoS Computational Biology and received media coverage by Washington Post, New York Times, BBC, and Le Monde. He is an Associate Editor of the System Dynamics Review. He is the recipient of the College of Engineering’s Excellence Award for outstanding new Assistant Professors. He has a PhD in Public Policy with a concentration of System Dynamics from the State University of New York at Albany, and an MBA, and BSc in Mechanical Engineering from Sharif University of Technology. Prior to joining Virginia Tech, Navid was a postdoctoral researcher at MIT, Engineering Systems Division.

Cancer Prevention and Control with System Dynamics

April 17 at 11 am NY | 4 pm London | 11 pm Beijing | Time Converter

Cancer Prevention and Control with System Dynamics – Discussion of a Systematic Review

This webinar delves into the findings of a systematic review on the application of System Dynamics modeling in cancer prevention and control, as presented in the recently published research in the PLOS ONE journal. It aims to explore the scope, characteristics, and quality of studies utilizing System Dynamics, including simulation and diagramming techniques such as causal-loop diagramming, in the context of cancer-related research. The research assess the quality of these studies, their alignment with the cancer control continuum, and the synthesis of their characteristics and models.

Special attention is given to diverse topics addressed in these studies, including chemotherapy treatments, tobacco or e-cigarette use reduction interventions, and cancer risks from environmental contamination. This presentation will highlight the current state of System Dynamics in cancer research, and address the need for rigorous, transparent model development and testing practices.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understanding System Dynamics in Cancer Research: Gain insights into how System Dynamics modeling, including both simulation and diagramming approaches, is applied in cancer prevention and control.
  2. Assessment of Study Quality and Scope: Learn to assess the quality of System Dynamics studies in cancer research using adapted criteria, and understand their alignment with the cancer control continuum.
  3. Identifying Key Focus Areas and Interventions: Acquire knowledge about the key focus areas within these studies, such as treatment, prevention, and detection, and explore the types of interventions modeled.
  4. Improvement and Best Practices: Recognize the need for improved rigor and transparency in model development and testing in cancer research using System Dynamics, and discuss the development of supportive infrastructure and best practices for multidisciplinary research.

About the Presenters

Erin Kenzie is an Assistant Professor at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon and holds faculty roles at the Portland State University System Science Program and the Oregon Rural Practice-based Research Network. She received her PhD in Systems Science from PSU in 2021. Dr. Kenzie’s research spans system dynamics, implementation science, and public health. She has been involved in research applying System Dynamics to colorectal cancer screening, behavioral health system capacity, unhealthy alcohol use screening and treatment, rural Veteran access to care, health plan-clinic partnerships, behavioral health integration, traumatic brain injury recovery, and climate change mitigation behavior.

Wayne Wakeland is Professor Emeritus of Systems Science at Portland State University. He also served as the Systems Science Program Chair for many years. He earned a B.S. and a Master of Engineering at Harvey Mudd College (1973); and a Ph.D. in Systems Science at Portland State U. (1977). He developed and taught courses on computer simulation methods and more recently a course on system sustainability and organizational resilience. His research focused on the use of computational models for studying a variety of topics, including complications during human pregnancy, recovery from concussion, and policies to reduce opioid drug diversion, abuse, and overdose deaths. Other topics included environmental/ecological sustainability and elevated intracranial pressure due to traumatic brain injusy. He has been active in the System Dynamics Society for many years and helps lead its Health Policy Special Interest Group.

Target Audience

This webinar is ideal for healthcare professionals, policy makers, researchers, academicians, and particularly students in fields like public health, oncology, systems engineering, and health policy. It offers insights into the application of System Dynamics in cancer prevention and control, making it a valuable learning opportunity for anyone interested in innovative research methodologies and their implications in healthcare.

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | Document the Model! What about the Modeling Process?

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, December 8th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98105285349 (Password: SDFA23). Our guest speaker will be Warren Farr (Informed Dynamic Solutions) presenting Document the Model! What about the Modeling Process? (see abstract and brief bio below, announcement and paper attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with him before or after the seminar, please fill out the following link by COB Friday, December 1st and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://rallly.co/invite/CM6MpCN2rGWb. Please notify me if you need to meet over Zoom instead

Abstract:              Documenting the process of building a simulation model is different from documenting the simulation model itself. Good model-building practice includes the discovery of potentially large sets of multimedia data. Organizing and documenting data and the process of collecting it has several advantages including: tightly linking data to its source and the timing of its discovery; separating source data from researcher inference (allowing for independent inspection); maintaining an evolutionary timeline; and easily sharing source data among participants and researchers. The topic of documenting models has been widely discussed. In contrast, this article proposes a data structure and its methods for documenting the process of building a simulation model.

This talk will focus on the motivations for building DynamicVu, an online software for documenting the modeling process using the data structure proposed in the SDR paper. Participants will be asked to reflect on the pros and cons of documenting the modeling process leading to an interactive discussion about best practices for documenting the model and the modeling process. How can such practices be supported in future software tools?

Brief Bio:             Warren Farr holds an MS in System Dynamics from Worcester Polytechnic Institute and an MBA degree from Duke University. Warren is a seasoned business leader with over 35 years of experience. With a technical background, he focuses on how business opportunities change over time and the profitable use of technology. He has been using System Dynamics for the past 15 years to create succinct and engaging strategies that are successfully implemented. Warren is currently vice-chairman of Refrigeration Sales Corporation, a US regional distributor of heating, ventilating, air conditioning, and refrigeration equipment, parts, and supplies. He is also the president of Informed Dynamic Systems, where he creates database solutions and system dynamic simulation models and coaches others in the use of system dynamics. Warren has served on the Policy Council of the System Dynamics Society and is currently a member of its Stewardship Committee.

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | The Shallowness of Deep Division

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, November 17th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98105285349 (Password: SDFA23). Our guest speaker will be Michael Macy (Cornell University) presenting The Shallowness of Deep Division (see abstract and brief bio below, announcement attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with him before or after the seminar, please fill out the following Doodle poll by COB Monday, November 13th and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://doodle.com/meeting/participate/id/bkoKOM6b. Please notify me if you need to meet over Zoom instead.

Abstract

Computational models reveal a tipping point in political polarization beyond which there is a potentially irreversible phase transition with two properties: 1) opinions become aligned across seemingly disparate political and cultural dimensions, and 2) existential threats to shared interests (like a lethal pandemic, catastrophic global warming, or aggression by a foreign adversary) have a divisive rather than unifying effect. This unraveling of the social fabric suggests partisan divisions that are deeply rooted in opposing ideologies. However, an online experiment suggests it may be the other way around. What appear to be irreconcilable differences in an increasingly polarized society may have arisen through a tipping dynamic that might just as easily have tipped the other way but for the luck of the draw among early movers. If so, the depth of the social fissure points to the shallowness of disagreements between tribal combatants whose vitriolic hostility is substantively unwarranted.

About the Presenter

Michael Macy is Distinguished Professor of Arts and Sciences at Cornell and Director of the Social Dynamics Lab. With support from the U.S. National Science Foundation, Google, Yahoo! Research, DARPA, IARPA, and the Korean National Research Foundation, his research team has used computational models, online laboratory experiments, and digital traces of device-mediated interaction to explore familiar but enigmatic social patterns, including network “wormholes,” circadian rhythms on Twitter and Spotify, racial discrimination on Airbnb, lifestyle politics, the polarization of science, network mobility, and partisan unpredictability. His research has been published in Science, PNAS, Science Advances, Nature Human Behaviour, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, and Annual Review of Sociology. 

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | If Vensim is the Answer, What is the Question?

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, October 20th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98105285349 (Password: SDFA23). Our guest speakers will be Tom Fiddaman (Ventana Systems) and Angie Moon (MIT Civil & Environmental Engineering)  presenting If Vensim is the answer, what is the question? Reflecting on the future direction of the System Dynamics tool and user ecosystem (see abstract below, announcement attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with Tom before or after the seminar, please fill out the following Doodle poll by COB Tuesday, October 17th and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://doodle.com/meeting/participate/id/e09LyWya.

Abstract

Once upon a time, data was scarce, simulation was nearly unheard of, there were few ways to build and use quality dynamic models, and models rarely gave direct input to decisions. This made it easy for tool builders and tool users to coevolve within their own disciplinary stovepipes. The scale of our problems, and hopefully our opportunities, means that isolation is no longer viable. System Dynamics modelers can increasingly benefit from new tools in data science, AI and machine learning, and many fields could benefit from SD knowledge guiding better dynamics, realistic behavior, and useful interaction with decision makers.

Our future could be bright, with AI assistants freeing modelers from boring tasks, raising the productivity of thinking about systems, and making model results accessible to users. Or, it could be dark, with “ChatMDL” rapidly generating the simulation equivalent of 3-legged chicken images, models with superficial validity but more propaganda value than predictive accuracy, faster than we can debunk them.

In this seminar, I’d like to explore the state of the System Dynamics tool portfolio and the requirements of modelers and model consumers. In passing, I will mention the near-term roadmap for Vensim, as well as the broader ecosystem of SD tools many of us use. But the real goal is to discuss the long-term vision for System Dynamics. How do we realize a future in which:

  • it’s easy to make every model a Bayesian blend of structure and parameter priors from subject matter expertise and data likelihoods?
  • aggregation is not a dark art, but automated in a flexible and principled way?
  • every model run is a synthetic data experiment supporting decision making under uncertainty?
  • support for exploration of the state space yields as much understanding as we get from analytical methods on simple models?
  • we have the computing power to support these innovations, and
  • we can explain what we’re doing to influence people to solve our biggest problems.

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | Institutional Ensembles and Cultural Institutional Capacity

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, October 13th from 1:00-2:30pm EST (please note the time change) in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98105285349 (Password: SDFA23). Our guest speaker will be Scott E. Page (University of Michigan) presenting Institutional Ensembles and Cultural Institutional Capacity (see abstract and brief bio below, announcement and paper attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with him before or after the seminar, please fill out the following Doodle poll by COB Friday, October 6th and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://doodle.com/meeting/participate/id/dPYN5qAe. Please notify me if you need to meet over Zoom instead.

Abstract 

We construct a series of models within a systems framework to analyze the interdependence between a society’s composition of institutions and its cultural-institutional capacity: the knowledge, behaviors, beliefs, norms, and networks that enables institutions to operate. In our models, a society selects a mixture of institutions of various types to allocate resources and take actions. These include markets, hierarchies, democracies, community-based institutions, or even algorithms. These institutional choices contribute to the production of cultural-institutional capacity, and, conversely, cultural-institutional capacity influences how well each institutional type performs. Cultural-institutional capacity building can be self-reinforcing. Markets can produce greater capacity for markets. It can also be generic and improve all institutional types. Neither of these forms of capacity building necessarily produces efficient ensembles of institutions. Paradoxically, systems with both forms can result in the collapse of an institutional type that builds generic capacity.

About the Presenter

Scott E. Page is the John Seely Brown Distinguished University Professor of Complexity, Social Science, and Management at the University of Michigan, and the Williamson family Professor of Business Administration, professor of management and organizations, Stephen M. Ross School of Business; professor of political science, professor of complex systems, and professor of economics, LSA. In 2011, he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Read more here.

Tackling Structural Racism in Health – Health Affairs

Understanding and addressing the impact of structural racism on health is essential to building health equity.

The October 2023 issue of Health Affairs, “Tackling Structural Racism in Health,” builds on the groundbreaking work contained in our February 2022 theme issue, “Racism & Health.”

It deepens and extends the scholarship on the relationship between structural racism, health, and health care with new research and perspectives on the politics of racism and how it is ingrained in health research and society.

You are invited to join us on Tuesday, October 3, 1:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. (Eastern) for a virtual forum at which panels of distinguished authors and experts will present their work and engage in discussions on topics including “Politics and the Legacy of Racism“; “Use Of Race And Ethnicity Data“; “Documenting Racism“; and “Responses to Racism.”

ISDC2023 Plenary Speaker Arielle Deutsch, Research Scientist at Avera Health will discuss findings from the forthcoming Health Affairs (#1 health policy journal) research entitled “How Funding Policy Maintains Structural Inequity within Indigenous Community-based Organizations”

REGISTER

other feature speakers:

Denis Agniel, Statistician, RAND Corporation
• Joseph Betancourt, President, The Commonwealth Fund
• Jessica Bylander, Senior Editor, Health Affairs
• Michael Paul Cary, Elizabeth C. Clipp Term Chair of School of Nursing, Duke University
• Chanelle M. Diaz, Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
• Zachary Dyer, MD Candidate, Chan Medical School, University of Massachusetts
• Shekinah Antoinette Fashaw-Walters, Assistant Professor, Division of Health Policy & Management, University of Minnesota
• Sandro Galea, Dean and Robert A. Knox Professor, Boston University School of Public Health
• Gilbert Gee, Professor and Chair, Department of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, UCLA, and Health Affairs Issue Adviser
• Simon Haeder, Associate Professor, School of Public Health, Texas A&M University
• Tina Hernandez-Boussard, Associate Dean of Research and Professor of Medicine, Stanford University
• Chidinma Adanna Ibe, Assistant Professor, Johns Hopkins Medicine
• Simbo Ige, Managing Director, Programs, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
• Jaquelyn L. Jahn, Assistant Professor, Dornsife School of Public Health, Drexel University
• Elaine Khoong, Assistant Professor, University of California, San Francisco; UCSF Division of General Internal Medicine, San Francisco General Hospital; and Health Affairs HEFT Fellow
• Jamila Michener, Senior Associate Dean for Public Engagement, Brooks School of Public Policy, Cornell University
• Jennifer Miles, Postdoctoral Associate, Institute of Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research, Rutgers University
• Ryan Petteway, Associate Professor, OHSU-PSU School of Public Health
• Jason Semprini, Postdoctoral Scholar, University of Iowa
• Milkie Vu, Assistant Professor in Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University
• Vabren Watts, Director of Equity, Health Affairs
• Joel S. Weissman, Deputy Director/Chief Scientific Officer, Center for Surgery and Public Health, Massachusetts General Hospital; and Associate Professor of Medicine, Institute of Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital
• Ruqaiijah Yearby, Kara J. Trott Professor in Health Law, Moritz College of Law, Ohio State University, and Health Affairs Issue Adviser

For questions, contact events@healthaffairs.org

 

 

MIT System Dynamics Seminar | A Replication Study of Operations Management Experiments in Management Science

Please visit the MIT System Dynamics Seminars page for more information.

You are invited to attend the System Dynamics Seminar being held on Friday, October 6th from 12:30-2:00pm EST in the Jay W. Forrester conference room, E62-450, or via Zoom: https://mit.zoom.us/j/98105285349 (Password: SDFA23). Our guest speaker will be Jordan Tong (Wisconsin School of Business) presenting A Replication Study of Operations Management Experiments in Management Science (see abstract and brief bio below, announcement and paper attached). Lunch will be provided to those attending in person and a reminder email will be sent out closer to the date.

If you would also like to schedule a 30-minute 1:1 meeting with him before or after the seminar, please fill out the following Doodle poll by COB Friday, September 29th and I will confirm times and location with a calendar invite: https://doodle.com/meeting/participate/id/dR1Wz7Eb. Please notify me if you need to meet over Zoom instead.

Abstract 

Over the last two decades, researchers in operations management have increasingly leveraged laboratory experiments to identify key behavioral insights. These experiments inform behavioral theories of operations management, impacting domains including inventory, supply chain management, queuing, forecasting, and sourcing. Yet, until now, the replicability of most behavioral insights from these laboratory experiments has been untested. We remedy this with the first large-scale replication study in operations management. With the input of the wider operations management community, we identify 10 prominent experimental operations management papers published in Management Science, which span a variety of domains, to be the focus of our replication effort. For each paper, we conduct a high-powered replication study of the main results across multiple locations using original materials (when available and suitable). In addition, our study tests replicability in multiple modalities (in-person and online) due to laboratory closures during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our replication study contributes new knowledge about the robustness of several key behavioral theories in operations management and contributes more broadly to efforts in the operations management field to improve research transparency and reliability.

About the Presenter

Jordan Tong is the Wisconsin Naming Partners Professor and Professor in the Department of Operations and Information Management at the Wisconsin School of Business.

Professor Tong’s research primarily employs mathematical modeling and experimental methods to investigate questions in operations management, analytics, and behavioral science. His research focuses on examining how human cognitive limitations interact with broader system dynamics to inform operations design. He has published in journals such as Management Science, Operations Research, Psychological Science, Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, and Production and Operations Management. He is currently an Associate Editor at Management Science and a Senior Editor at Production & Operations Management.

Professor Tong has taught undergraduate and Master’s-level courses in Operations Management, Operations Analytics, Supply Chain Management, Modeling & Optimization for Business Analytics, and the Psychology of Business Analytics. He received his PhD in Operations Management from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and his BA in Mathematics from Pomona College.