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Call for Designs

Call for Designs

by | Nov 10, 2021

Our current logo was designed in 1985 by George Richardson and Jack Pugh. Since then, the Society has been going through a great transformation. In the last two years, we have been on a quest to unify our efforts globally and bring our network together to expand the System Dynamics field. We’re experiencing a growing demand for the approach and people from different paths engage the Society to learn and apply the method to solve complex problems. Practitioners from the fields of systems thinking, data science, artificial intelligence, and others have been joining our events to learn how System Dynamics can complement their projects.

We recognize the desire to humanize the System Dynamics field. Representing the people behind the models and equations. Walking towards a more inclusive Society. Recognizing our role in raising and preserving the quality of public understanding about increasingly interdisciplinary systems phenomena.

We invite you to design a new logo that, in your point of view, reflects the words above. Follow these guidelines below to help you start, but feel free to be creative. The Marketing Committee will evaluate all submissions and use them to inform our final design. The final proposed decision will be selected with the input of members of the Policy Council. With the change, we expect to:

  1. Modernize our logo with a more contemporary design
  2. Strengthen the recognizability and connection with our identity 
  3. Increase Society awareness and positioning to the future

Guidelines

Simple

We want something to be easily identifiable at a glance. Something that allows for changes of size and colors and adapts to different backgrounds. We want to deliver a message without being complicated.

 Proof of time 

Our current logo is 36  years old. We hope to create a new one that will last for another 40 and passes the test of time and avoid current trends. What will our new logo look like in 10 years?

Versatile

The Society is present in several social media platforms, and we use different formats of content to promote the System Dynamics field (videos, images, stories, etc.). Our new logo needs the versatility to appear on a post, a t-shirt, a presentation, and our website. We’ll use it in different colors and sizes. 

 Remember our Audience

We’re a global and diverse community. We’re not only from many countries, but we come from different industries, schools, and organizations. We’re welcoming more and more people from systems thinking and other related fields. Bear in mind to be inclusive of the wide variety of individuals that comprise our field.

 Colors

The Society was born at MIT and our logo reflects the MIT logo colors. We’re ready to move forward and establish ourselves as a global organization. The psychology behind color is complex, colors have certain emotions and ideas attached to them. We’re open to seeing different suggestions, but mindful of the need to reduce the disruption that a color change may bring.  While we may start with the same red color, we may want to shift the colors over time.  Feel free to consider other colors.

 Typography 

A good font will complement our new logo. There are hundreds of fonts out there that give different moods. We’re aiming at something modern, simple, and easy to read across different platforms and display sizes.  

 Icons

We’re all about simulation models and causal loops diagrams so must our new logo have looping arrows on it? Definitely not. Creativity is boundless. There are hundreds of ways to represent our identity. We’re looking for meaningful elements that motivate curiosity. And for a balance between the familiar and the new.

Tools

You may use any tool you wish – even a hand-drawn logo that simply gives an idea of what you are going for. The Society uses Canva for design.  Canva is a free tool that you can use as well.  While you may use any tool you wish, we prefer that we receive the ultimate design that is editable in canvas.  Otherwise, we may need your help in getting the logo into various formats.

“Mother” Logo 

The logo will ideally be easily modifiable to act as a “Mother” Logo – one which can be modified slightly for use by conferences, chapters, and SIGs.  Including an example of how this might be accomplished is preferred.

 DEADLINE

Send us your proposal no later than December 10. You can use the form below to send us your files.

Submit your ideas using the form below:

Whoops, this form is available for members only. If you have a membership, please log in. If not, you can definitely get access! Purchase a membership here. Contact us at office@systemdynamics if you'd like to submit ideas without becoming a member.
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